Drones/UAVs

Drones for Good Award gets exciting entries from saving lives to crisis control

This entry is part 5 of 7 in the series Future of Gov

We had earlier written about Harnessing technology to improve the life of people, the UAE Drones for Good Award which had received huge response.

drone for good

 Thirty-nine contestants have made it to the semi-finals of the national, international and government levels at the UAE Drones for Good Award.

The entrants offer innovative solutions in the provision of services that benefit humanity, especially in areas such as disaster relief, public health, agriculture, environment, town planning, and logistics.

The successful entries to the semi-final stage have come from countries ranging from the UAE, Saudi Arabia, Kenya and Sudan to Australia, Germany, Canada, the US, UK, Spain, New Zealand, Poland, Switzerland, and Singapore.

Drone for Organ transport, landmine detection

A team from Spain have designed a drone that can transport organs for transplant from donor centres to the receiver efficiently and in short periods of time, thus keeping the organ alive and reducing chances of rejection. All the logistics process involving the donation and transplantation is remodelled; coordinating the communication between hospitals and creating a digital database to collect and organise all the data, streamlining the process and reducing costs and possible document losses. Our project would go a step further in the medical system, saving more lives.

A project that makes landmine detection not only efficient but also safe was also from spain. There are over 70 countries that have landmines buried in their soil, creating new victims to these deadly weapons every year. Current methods of landmine detection are slow and dangerous so we developed a method to detect mines from the air that doesn’t put people at risk.

Towing flood victims to develivering packages

Tomasz Marek Muszynski from Poland has combined observation, communication and rescue capabilities in one system to develop a drone that can detect drowning people, ensure their safety through wireless audio-video transmission system, and even help tow them to the coast at a speed controlled by a lifeguard.

Clinton Burchat from Australia has come up with a project that eliminates the need for a large yard for drones to make package deliveries.

“Current drone delivery methods require you to have a large yard. The delivery is usually done either by landing the drone in your yard or by dropping the package down on a string. Both these solutions pose danger to the recipient, including people, pets and children. The idea of my proposal is to not only to make drone delivery accurate by the millimetre but also to make it safer at the same time,” said Clinton.

Florian Seibel and his team’s Quantum project combines the advantages of a helicopter with that of a fixed-wing plane to create a drone that can fly longer, further and safer. According to Florian, due to its high payload capacity and the ability to travel more than 500km, the Quantum drone can be deployed in a number of areas such as agriculture, humanitarian aid, disaster relief and logistic purposes.

A team from Singapore has submitted a project to develop an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with a “built-in fail-safe” and “sense-and-avoid” functions, making it capable of delivering cargos efficiently and safely.

Mouza Ahmad Al Shemaili and his team, also from the UAE, have developed a multi-copter brand, Ultimate-UAV, which eliminates fog from the atmosphere in an eco-friendly way. “Our aim is to help drivers by reducing the dangers from low visibility on roads during foggy weather. In addition, the project will support civil aviation by helping avoid airport closures and flight delays, or flight manoeuvre above airports, which increases pollution,” said Mouza.

Khaled Abdelgawad from Saudi Arabia, whose project uses drones to map and track disaster zones to assist effective rapid response to crisis situation, said: “Our technology provides first responders with situational awareness, mapped damage, established target areas for disaster relief, effective communication with coordinated response plan, and aid in search and rescue efforts to identify survivors and recover the lost.”

The project submitted by Jussi Angesleva and his team from Germany uses drones to provide a bird’s-eye view of large architectural structures, which are difficult to appreciate at ground level. Explaining the way the drone project functions, Jussi said: “The flight path is predefined and autonomous, but the view that the audience gets is freely adjustable.”

Marco Urs Wuethrich from New Zealand has devised a drone that is capable of providing aerial support to coastguard rescue vessels searching for people or boats in distress situations.

The Flyability team from Switzerland has developed Gimball, a drone that can enter confined spaces and fly safely close to humans, proving to be very effective in rescue missions. “Our game-changing drone is capable of colliding with obstacles without losing its stability and, is protected by a rotating cage around, making it possible to fly very close to humans,” said Patrick Thevoz, one of the members of the Flayability team.

Alex Ramirez-Serrano from Canada has come up with a highly manoeuverable UAV that can help locate and rescue persons from buildings on fire, collapsed building, mines, or other urban and industrial entrapments.

While drones are feared as being threat to privacy and security, we are seeing UAVs with civil motive of helping make a difference to peoples lives. Govepreneurs can sense many a startup opportunity to create new projects or create a new market in this new Drone wave.

Make a Drone for Good and win One Million Dollars – UAE Govt

This entry is part 2 of 7 in the series Future of Gov

drone for good

Gone are the days when Drones were used for killing in conflict areas. Civilian applications for drones have come of age and the UAE Government offers USD 1 Mn to promising prototypes that may benefit humanity.

There is a also prize of one millon AED for UAE nationals in the national competition.

Here is the details.

The International competition is dedicated to rewarding the most promising prototypes of future services that may benefit humanity at large.

Submissions must be able to demonstrate a working prototype that could conceivably be developed into a working system within the next 1 to 3 years.

The goal of the international competition is to highlight the most advanced research into UAVs and drones and accelerate their application in humanitarian, development and public service applications.

Eligibility
  • The International competition is open to anyone in the world.
  • Individuals, teams, or companies are eligible.
  • An individual, team or company may submit up to three (3) separate entries.
  • Eligible participants from the National competition may also enter the International competition as well.
Criteria

Submissions must:

  • Be forward looking and use the most advanced civilian UAV technology available
  • Describe the human need
  • Describe the proposed solution for meeting that need
  • Describe how it will be done

Submissions can suggest new ways of improving an existing service using drones, or new kinds of services that could be practically and economically implemented through these technologies.

Submissions must also be:

  • Fully autonomous
  • Safe
  • Effective
  • Economical
Categories

Submissions to the International competition can address any human need, service improvement or public good. This could include:

  • Disaster relief
  • Humanitarian aid
  • Economic development
  • Public health
  • Education
  • Civil defense
  • Logistics
  • Environment
  • Etc.

Concepts need not be 100% ready to deploy today, but must push the boundaries of what may be possible in the coming 1 to 3 years.

This could include applications to disaster relief, humanitarian aid, or any number of government services or useful applications.

Timeline & Key Dates

The International competition has three phases:

  • Phase 1: Open Call – 11th of May to 1st of August, 2014
  • Phase 2: Semi-finals – 15th of August to 15th of November, 2014
  • Phase 3: Finals – 1st of December, 2015 to 1st of January, 2015
Phase 1: Open Call

Phase 1 begins on the 11th of May. The goal of Phase 1 is to come up with the best idea for improving human lives through drone-based services. Participants have until the 1st of May to complete their registration, create a 2 minute video describing their idea, and submit a video to the competition website. A long-list of semi-finalists will be announced by the 1st of August.

Phase 2: Semi-finals

Phase 2 begins on the 15th of August, with the announcement of the long-list of semi-finalists. The goal of Phase 2 is to describe a complete technical solution for your service idea. Semi-finalists will need to submit a detailed technical proposal describing how their service idea will be delivered. Full technical documentation must be upload to the competition website by the 15th of November, 2014.

Phase 3: Finals

The final round of the International competition begins on the 1st of December, 2014 with the announcement of the short-list of finalists. The goal of the Final Phase is to address concerns raised in Phase 2 and demonstrate the actual service. Finalists must prepare a short presentation outlining the technical, functional and economic aspects of their service, as well as perform a live demonstration in front of a panel of judges in Dubai on January 1st, 2015. The winner will be selected and announced one month later at the Government Summit in Dubai, February 8th, 2015.

Award
  • All semi-finalists of the International competition will receive $5,000 USD to develop and improve their prototype.
  • All finalists for the International competition will be flown to Dubai, UAE for the final presentation and award, with their accommodation and other expenses covered.
  • The 1st place winner of the International competition will receive $1 million USD.
How to Submit

To submit, participants must do the following:

Phase 1: Open Call
  • Step 1: Register on this website
  • Step 2: Upload a 1 to 2 minute video describing your service concept
    Your Video submission should:

    • Describe the service need
    • Describe the proposed solution for meeting that need
    • Describe how it will be done
    • Be uploaded to YouTube, Vimeo, or any other video-sharing website, set to private, and the link should be pasted into the submission form.
  • Step 3: Describe your service idea in 500 words or less
Phase 2: Semi-Finalists

A group of candidates from the open call will then be selected as semi-finalists. They will be selected based on the quality of their idea, the importance of their service, and the feasibility of their concept.

Semi-finalists will be invited to submit a detailed technical proposal that must include:

  • Detailed description of the service including:
    • 3 to 5 minute video
    • 2,000 to 5,000 word write-up describing the full service
  • A technical report detailing:
    • Plans & schematics of how it will work
    • Components used
    • Flight time, speed and range
    • Operating system
    • Take off and landing
    • Power source
    • Avionics, sensors / optics
    • Cargo system
    • Tracking / management system
    • Etc
  • Estimated cost
  • Safety, security and regularity issues raised
  • Other limitations of the service and proposed solutions

Semi-finalists will be judged by a dedicated Technical Committee from around the world, based on their assessment of the feasibility and technical aspects of the proposed service.

Phase 3: Finalists

A small group of finalists will then be selected from the semi-final proposals. Finalists will be flown to Dubai in January to give a live presentation and demonstration of their service in front of a panel of final judges. The winner will be chosen and announced one month later, on February 8th, 2015, at the Government Summit in Dubai.

In their presentation Finalists must:

  • Describe the service
  • Describe the need
  • Describe the technical system
  • Describe the feasibility of the approach
  • Address any technical concerns raised by the Technical Committee

Points will be awarded based on the importance of the service, the feasibility of the proposal, the strength of the presentation, and the results of the live demonstration. The winner will be selected by the Judging Panel and announced at the Government Summit 2015.